Sunrise to Sunset in The City of Saints – 24 Hours in Montreal

There are a lot of reasons to visit Montreal, the City of Saints, also well known as Canada’s Festival City. In recent years, the city has seen a number of startups in the tech industry and a recent report proposes that Montreal will see an economic growth of 3.2 percent in 2017 and 2 percent in 2018. This exciting growth is great for a number of industries, so it’s possible you’ll find yourself there for a meeting or two. If so, make sure to take some time to explore this city! It is one of the most cultural, happening cities in Canada to visit, so make the most of it. We’ve got a few ideas on the best ways to spend an extra 24 hours in Montreal:

Morning:

One of the best things about Montreal is that no matter what time of year you visit, there is always something to do. The city is easily navigated through the wonderful metro system, and if the train doesn’t go there, a bus does. Off the bat, you’ll see that Montreal operates on a different schedule than we do in Vancouver. Things start a little later, so don’t feel bad about sleeping in today. Take your time, and make your way to The Sparrow for a delicious brunch. You’ll love the cozy ambiance of this small restaurant, and its location in the heart of the Plateau.

A photo of the Sparrow in Montreal

Photo Credit: The Sparrow

After filling up at the Sparrow, take some time to explore this neighbourhood. It’s jam-packed with history and funky little shops throughout. If you’re here on a weekend, almost definitely there will be something going on! If you’re looking for ideas, check out MTL Blog, where you can always find upcoming events.  

Afternoon:

Now that you’ve explored the “Plateau” head down to the Old Port or Vieux-Port, where you’ll feel you’ve just stepped into a small town in Europe. This part of Montreal is packed with old-world charm, gorgeous buildings, great restaurants and bars, cobblestone streets and is so quintessentially Montreal. You can’t visit the city and not the Old Port. You’ll find from here you can wander through Old Montreal, and if you’re visiting from Spring to Fall, there are a number of outdoor activities scattered around. If you find yourself there in the winter, few places are more magical than Old Montreal as the sun sets and the glimmering lights come on. Montreal celebrates its winters, so watch for any number of festivals regardless of snow or cold weather!

A photo of Marche Bonsecours

Photo by: Robert Cutts

Pop into the Marche Bonsecours to check out this historic building and boutiques and restaurants. After, duck into any of the pubs or bars and restaurants and join the very happening cinq-à-sept (5pm-to-7pm), crowd.

Evening:

By this time there’s no doubt you’ve fallen in love with this part of Montreal, and you can always return later! But first make your way over to St. Denis Street (or rue St-Denis), where you’ll find Chambre À Part. This rustic-chic gem has warm ambiance as well as delicious dishes that won’t break the bank. Take a walk along St. Denis, taking in the historic buildings, colorful spheres in the trees. Stop off at one of many bars along this street, or make your way to St. Catherine where you will have unlimited options.

A photo of Place des Arts

Photo by: Matias Garabedian

Wander past Place des Arts where any time of the year you will find beautiful displays of art and light, or in the warmer months, fountains you can simply stroll through. The area is often blocked off in the summer months where music festivals and outdoor concerts delight locals and visitors alike.

Wander along St. Catherine’s and grab a pint at one of the lively pubs or bars on Rue Crescent. At Hurley’s Irish Pub you can enjoy live music every night of the week. There are two floors with completely different vibes. Downstairs you’ll find a more Irish pub feel if that’ is what you are looking for!

Late Night:

Lucky for you, Montreal is a city with an exciting nightlife. At any given point of the night, you can make your way to a new place and have a very different experience. With great live music, tasty drinks and great food, not to mention many that stay open until 4 am, there’s no need to rush around when you only have 24 hours in Montreal. Slow down, taste your meals, and take in the culture that is so uniquely Montreal.

 

WestJet for Business Travel

Since 1996, Westjet has been connecting Canadians to destinations throughout Canada and beyond. It started as a low-cost carrier based in Western Canada, serving only Calgary, Edmonton, Kelowna, Vancouver, and Winnipeg.

Today, they serve 45,000 passengers per day, to 100+ destinations in Canada, United States, Europe, Mexico and Central America. They fly in and out of major commercial centres such as London, New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Chicago, and Phoenix. This growth in destination and scale has created the demand for their comprehensive WestJet for Business Travel program.

WestJet for Business Travel

WestJet’s website states ‘We know business travel can be challenging, so we offer a variety of services and benefits to help your day go as smoothly as possible. Benefits like no overbooking, a rewards program with no blackouts, a convenient schedule and more’.

Worldgo took a deep dive into the nuances of this program and broke down the major benefits for our corporate travel clients.

Instant Savings

When a business enrolls with the WestJet for Business Travel program through a travel management company, like Worldgo <link>, they receive an instant savings of between 3-8%. That’s a significant difference over the course of a year. Queue one happy accountant.

No Overbooking

This one is straightforward. Media has shone a bright light recently on overbooking, featuring dramatic scenes of people being forced out of their scenes. With WestJet for Business Travel, your seat is your seat. Period.

Name Changes

Staff get sick? With WestJet for Business Travel you can change the name of a ticketed traveler without any fuss. Peace of mind.

WestJet Connect

WestJet for Business Travel

Internet access in the sky. WestJet offers business travelers the chance to choose from 3 different Internet options while flying. Convenience.

Fare Options and Scheduling

On a budget? No problem. WestJet is known for their low-rates fare class and convenient scheduling, but it’s their Premium Economy class options that’s ideal for business travel in Canada.

Premium Economy Options (Plus)

WestJet for Business Travel

Need more leg room, or more space for your laptop? With WestJet for Business Travel you can take advantage of low fares with more comfortable seat options. In this age of ‘pay for everything’ flights over 2.5hrs receive lunch-style fare.

Two (2) checked bags (Plus)

Lugging around brochure stands and sales equipment? Take advantage of 2 complimentary checked bags and put a smile on your accountant.

Priority Seating Available Airports (Plus)

Nobody likes lines. Get seated fast and you can get back to work quicker or stretch your legs a little sooner.

No change fees (Plus)

Ever had your New York clients cancel the day before you’re set to arrive, and a staff emergency happen in San Francisco. That can be a costly hit to your business budget. With WestJet for Business Travel in the Premium Economy (Plus) class, you can have peace of mind that and flexibility up to 2hrs before your flight takes off. There are some minor terms, but all are very reasonable.

WestJet dollars

If you spend $6000/year with WestJet for Business Travel you are rewarded with Gold Status. Gold Status earns 5% back in WestJet dollars, gets 10 airport lounge passes, and perks like 2 free checked bags, priority screening, and advance seat selection.

Partner Lounges

WestJet for Business Travel

Partner Lounges give travelers a chance to unwind comfortably before their next flight. Lounges are available in cities like Calgary, Toronto, Vancouver, Edmonton, Winnipeg, Montreal, and London to name a few.

Although their humble roots began as low-cost carrier flying used planes into modest destinations, their vision has remained anything but. WestJet has grown into a brand that is now synonymous with customer service and ‘staff ownership’. They have earned the trust of Canadian business travel, and have evolved to meet the demands of Canadian business travelers.

Contact Worldgo today and let’s chat about how we can include WestJet for Business Travel in your corporate goals.

Duty of Care and its Impact on Employers

Duty of Care – Yesterday

In 1928, Ms. May Donaghue of Glasgow, Scotland drank what has become known in Western Law as ‘The snail in the bottle case’ and more succinctly it set the legal precedent for Duty of Care. The case states that Ms. Donaghue was given a bottle of ginger beer from a friend, and proceeded to consume the contents only to discover it contained the remains of a decomposed snail. The bottle was tinted dark, and she didn’t notice the foreign object until substantially through the bottle. She later fell ill and contracted gastroenteritis. Ms. Donaghue lodged a writ in the Scotland’s highest courts seeking £500 in damages against Mr. David Stevenson, the producer of the ginger beer.

Because she had not purchased the bottle herself, there was no breach of contract. However, her lawyers claimed Stevenson to be negligent of breaching a duty of care, an area largely untested in Western Law. In 1932, after a lengthy court battle, it was established that Mr. Stevenson to be responsible for the well-being of individuals who consume his products, given that they could not be inspected.

The outcomes of this precedent setting case were three-part.

Negligence 

A plaintiff can take civil action against a respondent if the respondent’s negligence causes the plaintiff injury or loss of property.

Duty of care 

Secondly, the case established that manufacturers have a duty of care to the end consumers or users of their products. According to Lord Atkin’s ratio decendi, “a manufacturer of products, which he sells… to reach the ultimate consumer in the form in which they left him… owes a duty to the consumer to take reasonable care”. This precedent has evolved and now forms the basis of laws that protect consumers from contaminated or faulty goods.

Neighbour principle

In Donoghue’s case she had not purchased the ginger beer but had received it as a gift; she was a ‘neighbour’ rather than a party to the contract. Atkin stated: “You must take reasonable care to avoid acts or omissions which you can reasonably foresee would be likely to injure your neighbour.

Duty of Care – Today

We’ve come along way since 1932, and the Duty of Care principle has evolved from ‘goods’ to ‘goods and services which could reasonably be foreseen to cause people harm’. It extends to all of us that provides an exchange of goods and services and extends not just to clients, but to employees. This means that under Canada’s Criminal Code employers must take reasonable steps to protect workers, whether they are in Canada or working abroad.

Across the pond a recent Galaxy Research survey in Australia had startling findings, including that:

• 93% of business leaders are comfortable they can properly manage their own company’s liabilities

• Only 30% of businesses actually had a plan of action directly addressing traveling employees

• Only 50% actively assess and manage employee risk on a regular basis

• 54% of employees said their employer does not provide information and communication specific to unexpected eventualities whilst traveling for business

A few steps can make all the difference to your Duty of Care

1. Ensure your organization has both the understanding and current technology to know the location of your employees while they are traveling on your behalf

2. Plan for an incident by developing a corporate policy on travel and a response plan in the event of an incident that includes a family support plan

3. Educate your employees about potential risks and challenges to personal safety and security before they leave

4. Be able to communicate with your employees at all times, and provide assistance during an emergency

The costs associated with meeting the duty of care principle include working with credible corporate travel service providers in developing a risk management plan, training your employees and providing necessary insurance.

The costs of not meeting the duty of care principle far outweigh today’s gamble, especially for a small to a mid-sized company where the impacts are far more profound.

If you are concerned about your Duty of Care as it relates to employee travel, please contact us today.