Understanding your Airline’s Meal Options

There are now 35 accepted airline meal options available on flights around the world. It’s not to say your airline will be offering all 35 of these options, but it is helpful to know what your choices are – as not all options are outwardly listed on every airline. The most commonly listed options include vegetarian and vegan options, selections that meet restrictive religious diets, gluten-free, dairy-free, peanut-free, no-lactose, and children’s meals. There are also choices like Bland Meals, Fruit Platters, and High-Fibre meals that you may want to check out.

If you have a restrictive diet, it’s important to reference and understand the airline meal codes. Make sure you note the cut off time for the advance ordering of your meals. Some airlines require a minimum of 48hrs before your departure to accept any custom meal demands.

Airline meal codes in alphabetical order, below:

  1. AVML – Asian Vegetarian Meal – A flavourful vegetarian alternative, with likely standards being curry dishes.  Expect rice, noodles, fruit, vegetables and milk products –  but no meat, fish or eggs.
  2. BBML – Baby Meal
  3. CAKE – Birthday Cake – airlines vary in their offering of birthday cakes. Some charge and some are complimentary when pre-ordered.
  4. BLML – Bland Meal– some critics say all airline meals are bland but in this case, the meal is designed for passengers who may have ulcers, heartburn, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or have undergone stomach or intestinal surgery. Includes foods that are soft, not very spicy, and low in fiber.
  5. CHML – Children Meal –Some adults, especially those with dentures or softer teeth, order children’s meals as usually contain soft and easier to chew foods. They often include an airline-branded toy or colouring book and crayons.
  6. CLML – Celebration Cake Meal
  7. DBML – Diabetic Meal- Sugar reduced items only
  8. FPML – Fruit Platter Meal – Seasonal fresh fruit
  9. GFML – Gluten Intolerant Meal- No wheat, rye, barley or other gluten-based products
  10. HFML – High Fibre Meal
  11. HNML – Hindu Non-Vegetarian Meal- Traditionally flavoured meals that will likely contain lamb, poultry, fish or milk but absent of beef, veal or pork.
  12. JPML – Japanese Meal (served on Japan Airlines only)
  13. JNML – Junior Meal. Not a kid’s meal, but not an adult meal, either.
  14. KSML – Kosher Meal- Confirmed to be prepared to meet strict Jewish Kosher cooking rules.
  15. KSMLS – Kosher Meal (Snack size)
  16. LCML – Low-Calorie Meal
  17. LFML – Low Fat Meal
  18. LPML – Low Protein Meal- Contains a restricted quantity of protein, specifically geared for those with liver and kidney ailments. These meals may contain fresh fruit and vegetables, vegetable fats and seasoning, and a measured amount of eggs and meat.
  19. LSML – Low Salt Meal- LSML, intended for persons with high blood pressure or high-sodium intolerance.
  20. MOML – Muslim Meal- Foods that do not contain any pork, gelatine or alcoholic beverages.
  21. NBML – No Beef Meal (on China Airlines)
  22. NFML – No Fish Meal (on Lufthansa Airlines)
  23. NLML – No Lactose lactose-free) meal – It excludes milk and dairy products – yogurt, cheese, butter, ice cream, water ice and etc.
  24. OBML – Japanese Obento Meal (on United Airlines)
  25. ORML – Oriental Meal- The main course features an “Oriental style” accompanied by beef, pork, chicken, duck, or fish.
  26. PFML – Peanut Free Meal – No peanuts, peanut butter, or other peanut derivative items.
  27. PRML – Low Purine Meal – For people struggling with gout.
  28. RVML- Raw Vegetable Meal – Only raw vegetables and salads.
  29. RFML – Refugee Meal
  30. SFML – Seafood Meal– Contains only seafood items
  31. SPML – Special Meal – Specify Food
  32. VGML or VVML: Vegetarian Vegan Meal – No animal products, including meat, fish, dairy, eggs, honey.
  33. VJML – Vegetarian Jain Meal – Only fresh fruit and stem vegetables that grow above the ground. It won’t contain: animal products/by-products, honey or any root vegetables such as carrots and potatoes.
  34. VLML – Vegetarian Lacto-Ovo Meal – Contains vegetables, fresh fruit, eggs, dairy products. It does not contain any type of fish or meat.
  35. VOML – Vegetarian Oriental Meal – This is a vegetarian meal that is prepared ‘Chinese’ or ‘Oriental’ style.

How to deal with Jet lag

For many business travelers, jet lag is a legitimate and ongoing challenge that can hinder performance, increase anxiety and create travel resentment. Most business travelers, especially those that cross 2 timezones in travel, express negative impacts and take proactive measures to mitigate symptoms.

What is Jet lag?

Jet lag, also known as desynchronosis or flight fatigue, is a disorder that leads to insomnia, an overall sense of aches and tiredness, and other symptoms that arise due to travel across multiple time zones. It is a circadian rhythm sleep disorder, and as creatures of routine, this is an abrupt disruption of our internal clock.

When we travel to a new time zone, our circadian rhythms need time to adjust, anecdotally, regular travelers claim that it takes one day for every one hour of time zone travel. This results in our bodies telling us it is time to sleep when it’s actually the middle of the afternoon, or it makes us want to stay awake when it is late at night. This experience is known as jet lag.

What are the other symptoms?

Besides travel fatigue and insomnia, a jet lag sufferer may experience a number of physical and emotional symptoms, including anxiety, constipation, diarrhea, confusion, dehydration, headache, irritability, nausea, indigestion, difficulty concentrating, sweating, coordination problems, dizziness, daytime sleepiness, malaise (a general feeling of being unwell), and even memory loss. Some individuals report additional symptoms, such as heartbeat irregularities and increased susceptibility to illness.

Generally, people do not need a medical evaluation for a diagnosis of jet lag. If you have traveled across several time zones and feel the symptoms associated with jet lag, you likely have it. If your symptoms of jet lag are severe, do not go away after a few days, or you have any other concerns, see a doctor.

How long does it take to recover from jet lag?

Recovering from jet lag depends on the number of time zones crossed while traveling. In general, the body adjusts to the new time zone at the rate of 1-2 time zones per day. For example, if you crossed 6 time zones, the body will typically adjust to this time change in 6-8 days. Jet lag is temporary, so the prognosis is excellent and most people will recover in a predictable amount of time. Many travelers report a 1st-day adrenaline bump, meaning their personal effects are delayed and not felt until 2 or even 3 days into their journey.

Complications of jet lag are extremely rare. If a person has a preexisting heart condition, the stress of the disruption in the circadian rhythm, combined with the stress of travel, high altitude, and immobility during flight may result in a heart attack. If the jet lag results in chronic sleep deprivation, stroke may occur in certain predisposed individuals.

What causes jet lag?

The cause of jet lag is the inability of the body of a traveler to immediately adjust to the time in a different zone. Thus, when a New Yorker arrives in Paris at midnight Paris time, his or her body continues to operate on New York time. As the body struggles to cope with the new schedule, temporary insomnia, fatigue, irritability, and an impaired ability to concentrate may set in. The changed bathroom schedule may cause constipation or diarrhea, and the brain may become confused and disoriented as it attempts to juggle schedules.

How business travelers cope with jet lag?

– Work with your travel consultant to select a flight that allows early evening arrival and stay up until 10 p.m. local time. (If you must sleep during the day, take a short nap in the early afternoon, but no longer than two hours. Set an alarm to be sure not to over sleep.)
– Anticipate the time change for trips by getting up and going to bed earlier several days prior to an eastward trip and later for a westward trip.
– Upon boarding the plane, change your watch to the destination time zone.
– Taking sleeping pills, like Melatonin, are commonly accepted measures used to minimize certain sleep disorders.
– Avoid alcohol or caffeine at least three to four hours before bedtime. Both act as “stimulants” and prevent sleep.
– Upon arrival at a destination, avoid heavy meals (a snack—not chocolate—is okay).
– Avoid any heavy exercise close to bedtime. (Light exercise earlier in the day is fine.)
– Bring earplugs and blindfolds to help dampen noise and block out unwanted light while sleeping.
– Try to get outside in the sunlight whenever possible. Daylight is a powerful stimulant for regulating the biological clock. (Staying indoors worsens jet lag.)
– Contrary to popular belief, the type of foods we eat has no effect on minimizing jet lag.

According to experts, stress or the potential for stress is another problem that can lead to sleeplessness. Two common travel-related stress conditions are the “First Night Effect” and the “On-Call Effect.” The first condition occurs when trying to sleep in a new or unfamiliar environment. The second is caused by the nagging worry that something just might wake you up, such as the possibility of a phone ringing, hallway noise or another disruption.

Try these tips on your next trip to help avoid travel-related stress and subsequent sleeplessness:

– Bring elements or objects from home, like a picture of the family, favorite pillow, blanket or even a coffee mug) to ease the feeling of being in a new environment.
– Check with the hotel to see if voice mail services are available to guests. Then, whenever possible, have your calls handled by the service.
– Check your room for potential sleep disturbances that may be avoided; e.g., light shining through the drapes, unwanted in-room noise, etc.
– Request two wake-up calls in case you miss the first one.

How to save money while traveling for business in 2020

Save on your business travel in 2020

Business traveling comes with budgets. Budgets come with restrictions and limits. At Worldgo, we recognize that this is especially critical for early-stage operations, or business’ with considerable recurring travel needs. We created an off-the-cuff list of guidelines to help you get the most, for the least.

Here are some great ways to save money while travelling for business in 2020.

Dine out using the 10-15-25 rule

Unless you’re taking clients and stakeholders out to dinner, business travelers should aim to follow the ’10-15-25′ rule for dining out. The simple rule applies $10 for breakfast, $15 for lunch, and $25 for dinner, and if you can find a hotel with breakfast included, you will free up a more to spend on the other 2 remaining meals or tighten up your budget. There are very few places, Scandinavia being a possible exception, where this rule can’t be followed with relative ease. To stretch things further, look for Happy Hour discounts, or book accommodations with kitchens and trade dining-out for eating-in – which is generally a healthier option to begin with. Another great option, and increasingly interesting choice, is choosing food trucks. Cities like Portland, Seattle, and Vancouver are known for the quality and quantity of their food truck vendors.

Choose free activities

Parks, beaches, mountains, and quirky urban adventures are often free of admission and a great opportunity to get out, explore, and save a few dollars in the process. They are a great place to get your nature fix and see how locals enjoying their lives.

Use your credit card and loyalty points

You have a legion of points that have been quietly accumulating behind the scenes. It’s time to take stock of what those points can do. Credit cards can offer incredible rewards programs, such as travel air miles, gas, and restaurant options. If you don’t have a credit card with travel perks, it’s worth looking at a change.

Are you a AAA or CAA member?

Membership really can have its rewards. May hotels in North America recognize the American and/or Canadian Automobile Association membership. It’s not uncommon to save 10% off published rates for being a member. Saving 10% off 5 nights in New York could cover a year’s worth of membership costs.

Use cell phone apps to save on calls

There is Wi-Fi just about everyone; and smartphone apps like WhatsApp, which is huge in South America, Asia, and Europe, help travellers stay connected for free. Viber is another option for those looking to stay out of Facebook’s reach (they own WhatsApp).

Make sure you have the right cell-phone plan

If you don’t have the flexibility to get to wi-fi every time you need to make a call, at least reach out to your mobile provider and get them to recommend the best plan for your needs. You could pay $10/month in an updated subscription plan but save hundreds every time you go away.

Groupon still matters

Yes, it had its moment in the sun, but it hasn’t set yet, either. Groupon (Getaways) has a tonne of hotel deals and restaurant options. They may not meet your needs and there are certain restrictions about the number of nights, and seasonal availability, but its worth a look. It could save you 30-40% off the rack rate.

These are some simple ways to save while travelling for business, but it all starts with awareness and desire to save. Reach out to us today, and we’ll help you take this to the next level.

A handy guide to picking the right seats

Poor seats are the bain of a frequent traveler’s existence, especially those where access to Business and 1st class seats fall outside an organization’s approved travel policy. For the cost-conscious traveler, having to make the most out of economy class is the only option. One can, however, make the most of it, especially when we choose our seats properly, but what ‘properly’ looks like, can be different for everyone.

So, Worldgo has created a go-to list just for you:

Are you bringing carry-ons on board?

If you are traveling with awkward carry-ons that you make sure you choose a seat towards the rear of the airplane, this way you ensure you get the first choice of the overhead storage compartments.

Are looking to sleep?

Pick a window seat on the left-side of the aircraft. The middle of the craft generally means you won’t be bothered washrooms and people stretching their legs, plus the windows tend to be off-centered allowing you a better place to lay your head.

Nervous passenger? Choose seats in the rear of the plane.

Do you have flight anxiety?

Popular Mechanics states that passengers in the rear of the plane are 40% more likely to survive a crash than those in the front. If you are really concerned, make sure to choose an aisle seat for quicker faster deplaning.

Are you looking for extra legroom?

Choose Exit row seats. On some flights, you can have an extra 4-7 inches of legroom. Don’t confuse Bulkhead with Exit Row, they make look promising, you will lose storage space and that could cut into your leg-room.

Feeling Sick? Choose seats located over the wing.

Are you feeling under the weather?

The smoothest ride is always found with seats over the wings, and the bigger the plane the smaller the bounce. If you are prone to motion sickness or had a big night after closing the deal of the year, this is where you want to be.

Are looking for space away from kids?

If you are looking for as much quiet as possible we recommend 2 things. Firstly, get yourself a good pair of noise calling headphones and then choose seats as far away from the bulkheads as possible. Bulkheads are where families are often put, or select because they travel with more gear and tend to be closer to washrooms.

Are you looking to avoid engine noise?

Choose seats as close to the cockpit as possible and get yourself a pair of noise-canceling headphones. They really are a great investment for frequent travelers.

Are you looking for a quick exit after a long flight?

Ever noticed that airplanes almost always depart on the left side? It goes without saying that choosing an aisle seat up front, on the left, will get you out the door as fast as possible.

Are you looking to be close to the washrooms?

Choose bulkheads and/or aisle seats and ensure that running to the washroom is as fast possible.

Although you may not have the budget to fly 1st or Business Class you can still choose seats that give you the best flight possible. At Worldgo, we get to know your preferences and can help you make the most of your time in the sky!